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Equestrian Tourism: Uruguay

In the last edition we talked about Mongolia and its fascinating and rich history, a history that has been undeniably reliant on the domestication of the horse. Without horses Mongol history would look utterly different. In this post we’re talking about another country that has been shaped by horses and the people who ride them: Uruguay. Many people haven’t heard of Uruguay. This South American country has only a population of three million people with roughly one-third of them residing in the country’s capital of Montevideo. The country is sandwiched between the two giants of South America, Brazil and Argentina, roughly half-way down the continents eastern side. It has a long and beautiful coastline that is dotted with small fishing villages, a series of sometimes isolated lighthouses, and at least one town known for its partying and nightlife, Punta del Este. But for the equestrian traveller there are few places…

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Equestrian tourism: Mongolia

Horses have long been a part of human culture. There are countless cultures all across the world that have made horses central to their culture going well back into pre-history—the domestication of the horse is suspected to have happened sometime about five thousand years ago though no one is entirely sure. Horses have been used by pretty much every culture from the Japanese to the Portuguese and everything in between. But there is probably no culture that became more closely associated with the horse than the Mongols. While Mongolian history—like any other—stretches for centuries and has had different phases of development and its own golden and not-so-golden ages it was the 13th and 14th centuries that saw the Mongolians at the peak of their power. The Mongols were predominately pastoralists and organised along tribes and clans. The Mongolian steppes are vast tracts of land and are difficult to survive in….

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The horse: a great (but expensive) childhood pet

There are plenty of people—both adults and children—who aren’t much into animals and prefer the relatively tidier company of humans, but of those children who do like animals there’s not too much who don’t love horses. Horses are especially beloved by children, in my mind, because they are large and powerful creatures but are usually very gentle and loving. To a child that can be an extremely positive combination as the child can feel both safe and have a connection with an animal. Despite how important that obviously is, the biggest reward of having a child own a horse isn’t so much the way it makes the child feel, but the roles that it play in the child’s development is priceless. Children often cultivate feelings of strong responsibility towards their horses, especially if they have formed deep attachments. In in addition to the self-discipline and responsibility that the experiences affords…

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My personal favourite breeds

I’ve been round horses more or less my whole life. I grew up on a farm where we had horses both for pleasure and also for work (although we more often used mechanised and motorised equipment to plough the fields). Horses have therefore been my passion and a great part of my life. Riding as even given me great comfort and pleasure during difficult phases of my life. The only time I didn’t have horses was when I lived in the city for university but as soon as I graduated, I moved back to the country. Over the years, I’ve had many different breeds of horse and for my money, these are the top three breeds: Arabian. There are many reason why Arabian horses are probably the most popular breed in the world. Firstly, they have been round for hundreds and hundreds of years. As long ago as 1000 years…